Why the Indian Premier League has been such a hit

The rise of the IPL in a country where the Cricket Council mocked the T20 itself shows that the tournament’s success story exemplifies a strong combination of chance and opportunism.

Since 2008, most of the major cricket stars have taken a collective break from international and domestic cricket to take part in the Indian Premier League (IPL), which is often held over a two-month period from March to May. In short, during this time, the IPL has caused discontent in the cricket world as a whole. In retrospect, while it might have seemed inevitable that a shorter format would be required to watch cricket, it was not entirely clear at the time. In fact, it seems incredible today that BCCI and India were initially completely indifferent to the allure of the T20. But what contributes to the enduring appeal of IPL? What factors made the league what it is today – the largest commercial real estate outside of international cricket (and will likely surpass it soon)? The answer lies in two main factors – time and schedule.

The number one reason for the popularity of the IPL and T20 format, like many commercial products, was the time factor. At the turn of the millennium, the last stronghold of the spectators of the first division match – England – began to experience a decline in turnout. In particular, the younger generation chose to master other sports in favor of cricket. Stuart Robertson, Marketing Director of the European Central Bank, suggested looking at a compact format that would be more in line with the current requirements of the times. A year later, despite some opposition from district leaders over the recent harassment, the maternity ward found a midwife.

International cricket hasn’t taken form seriously – the first striking scenes appeared internationally in T20, and in it, Glenn McGrath received a fake red card for portraying the infamous armpit accident.

Within two years, most countries played their first T20 game, sparking a mixture of curiosity and bewilderment among fans. India was one of the last big countries to play the T20 debut game. His household version was stupidly raw. “T20? Why not ten, five or one? ” shook Niranjan Shah at the 2006 International Cricket Council (ICC) board meeting before boldly declaring that India would never play this coordination. The rival Indian Cricket League, which was gaining momentum, was quickly stopped by the Cricket Control Council of India (BCCI).

At the same time, the ODI format has stabilized. Australia fell asleep ahead of the World Cup final for the third time in a row and the best team was in shape with few surprises left; Various attempts by the ICC to revive the game (super sub, superhero series, experiment with domain restrictions, etc.) did not get to the point. India was disastrously kicked out of the group stage, making the tournament less attractive to various stakeholders. The 2007 World Cup comic book finale was a good example of what went wrong with the overdone cash cow, which was the ODI format.

In this setting, the T20 format captured the public’s imagination. It seems really hard to believe that India was not so keenly interested in sending a team to compete in the first T20 World Cup and had to be rejected slightly to do so by former ICC President Ihsan Mane. India was reluctant to send a team, which reflected BCCI’s distaste for the new format – a team led by Captain M.S. Dhoni was not a superstar. More importantly, the short, lean tournament was all that the ODI World Cup was not: Australia was invincible (even from Zimbabwe), many matches were close, and India’s victory guaranteed a look and some instant love. By the time India won the tense final, to paraphrase and misquote Victor Hugo, the BCCI couldn’t stop the T20 idea, whose time had come. The IPL was launched in a low-key manner a few days before the victory, and now the BCCI had the opportunity to be in the right place at the right time.

Eleven years after the first release, it’s safe to say that cricket is not what it has been since then. Another factor that undoubtedly worked for the IPL was planning. One look at the future program of the tour shows that international (and domestic) cricket has a certain pattern. Basically, cricket is played over a six month window in different countries around the world.

Cricket in England is a summer sport, especially during the height of summer. The same is true in other temperate countries that are not subject to heavy rainy seasons (April-September in England and October-March in Australia, South Africa and New Zealand). On the other hand, although Asian countries are located in the Northern Hemisphere, it is impossible to play cricket during the traditional English summer season due to seasonal rains. Consequently, in the Indian subcontinent, cricket is considered a winter sport (October-March) that operates in tandem with cricket schedules in the Southern Hemisphere. Despite strong sunshine throughout the year and lack of rainfall, the tropical West Indies faces another challenge – hurricane season in the second half of the calendar year. This international cricket schedule also extends to the domestic seasons. Given the pre-existing template, the expired T20 Champions League schedule window is clear.

This is why the IPL in April and May hit the schedule hard (not to mention coinciding with the summer school holidays); The games take place in the afternoon during the hottest and driest season of the year and do not conflict with traditional cricket seasons in most countries (with the exception of England and Wisconsin). In fact, this tournament opened a two-month period in India, where local cricket is traditionally not played because the brutal summer made the higher events too harsh for the players.

As the tournament does not conflict with the existing local structures of most cricket countries, the presence of the top stars has been guaranteed.

 

Cricket in England is a summer sport, especially during the height of summer. The same is true in other temperate countries that are not subject to heavy rainy seasons (April-September in England and October-March in Australia, South Africa and New Zealand). On the other hand, although Asian countries are located in the Northern Hemisphere, it is impossible to play cricket during the traditional English summer season due to seasonal rains. Consequently, in the Indian subcontinent, cricket is considered a winter sport (October-March) that operates in tandem with cricket schedules in the Southern Hemisphere. Despite strong sunshine throughout the year and lack of rainfall, the tropical West Indies faces another challenge – hurricane season in the second half of the calendar year. This international cricket schedule also extends to the domestic seasons. Given the pre-existing template, the expired T20 Champions League schedule window is clear.

This is why the IPL in April and May hit the schedule hard (not to mention coinciding with the summer school holidays); The games take place in the afternoon during the hottest and driest season of the year and do not conflict with traditional cricket seasons in most countries (with the exception of England and Wisconsin). In fact, this tournament opened a two-month period in India, where local cricket is traditionally not played because the brutal summer made the higher events too harsh for the players.

As the tournament does not conflict with the existing local structures of most cricket countries, the presence of the top stars has been guaranteed. West Indies are among the most sought after T20 stars, and disputes between players and the board have undoubtedly helped resolve the IPL issue. This also explains the love and hate relationship between the English cricket establishment and the IPL: English players either had to choose the IPL over their domestic commitments, or they were completely ignored. Undoubtedly, the IPL has a pioneering advantage, but, very importantly, it was supported by other favorable conditions – there is no home cricket game parallel to this tournament (as was the case in other countries such as Australia, England, etc. ). ) and it does not overlap with other T20 tournaments.

Thus, the IPL created the perfect storm and became an unprecedented league in world cricket.

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